Kilmashogue Wedge Tomb in the afternoon glow, 28-04-2012

Kilmashogue Wedge Tomb, looking over the gallery from the rear

A short, steep climb from the car park at Kilmashogue Forestry, along a track through the mature plantation, leads to an atmospheric clearing where the approximately four thousand year old ruins of a rather fine example of a bronze age wedge tomb lies. On an unexpectedly fine Saturday evening, it makes for an ideal spot for a quick visit with the family. It has all the charm and quiet of a fairytale forest, with pine cones to collect and a moss covered ‘fairy castle’ to explore!

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New rock art turns up in Naas?

A few weeks ago a photo was posted on a Facebook page of a stone outside a housing development in Naas, Co. Kildare. A passerby noticed a quite distinct partial ring around a wide bowl-like depression on the edge of the narrow granite stone, which is now set into the ground with it’s opposite face ground smooth, polished and engraved with the name of the estate. Continue reading

Doagh Holestone, Co. Antrim

The Doagh Holestone with a burst of sunlight on a fine evening in Spring, 2012

“Perforated stones, very similar to the ordinary pillar stone, are found in many parts of Ireland, Scotland, and even, as appears from Mr. Wilford’s Asiatic Researches, in India. Abroad, as well as at home, their origin is shrouded in the deepest mystery, and it is not likely that the subject can ever be fully elucidated.

In Ireland they are generally associated with prehistoric remains, and are occasionally found in connexion with our earliest, and only earliest, ecclesiastical establishments. As has been already suggested what they were primarily intended for, no man can say. It is highly probable that they had their origin in days most remote, and that, somehow or other, perhaps like the “holy wells”, they became, as it were, pressed into association with Christian rites.”  Wakeman, William F., Handbook of Irish Antiquities, 1891

The Doagh Holestone or ‘Lovestone’ stands high on the crest of a hill with commanding views across the Six Mile Water Valley in Co. Antrim. This attractively shaped stone, 1.5m high, enjoys regional fame for its central place in local lore and custom. Continue reading